Gifts for Christmas - Order by midnight Tuesday 18th December for UK delivery. Click here for details.
Contact
Back

World of Linley

Heritage

SCROLL TO DISCOVER Heritage

1985

David started his first workshop above a chip shop in Dorking. Despite the company’s humble beginnings, David Snowdon’s aim then is what still drives LINLEY today – designing and manufacturing furniture of the highest quality.

1987

Designed to seat up to 60 people, the Boardroom Table is 66ft long, 10ft wide and has 88 legs in total. It is the single largest piece LINLEY has ever made and was conceived as a series of individual models which could be used separately if required.

Made from oak felled from Windsor Great Park, the table is housed in the Boardroom of the Metropolitan Museum of Art – a fitting home a for a piece that was designed to be marvelled at.

1993

LINLEY relocates to new premises at 60 Pimlico Road, Belgravia, an area renowned for antiques and fine furniture – a true design district. It was from this location that LINLEY grew into the brand it is today.

“When I first started buying Christmas presents I used to visit a shop called Casa Pupo which is where the Pimlico Road shop is today. I was inspired by the shop and by Pimlico Road and that is why I wanted to set up my own shop there. I have always known people on Pimlico Road and the friendship of local shops has been a real help over the years.”

David Snowdon

2001

The first Aston chair arrives in the LINLEY showroom. Luxurious, comfortable and racy at the same time, the name ‘Aston’ evokes associations with another great British marque, Aston Martin.

The curvaceous, compound curves in the seat are moulded in the same way that a car seat is formed around the body to ensure maximum comfort and relaxation. The metal spring unit contained in the seat intensifies this.

The chair’s unusual fluid shape has a dynamism which gives the impression of movement, and renders the chair far less rigid and structured than a traditional armchair.

2004

The Helix collection is launched, combining an intricate aspect of traditional cabinet-making, marquetry, with sleek, geometric Modernism, inspired by the Danish 20th century masters. The motif recurrent in this collection is the intertwined twin strands of the double helix, or the unit cell of DNA, in marquetry inlay.

2005

LINLEY’S second shop is opened in Mayfair. The opening of this second store coincided with the 20th anniversary of LINLEY. No.46 Albemarle Street was constructed in 1955 on a bombed site on which two 18th century houses had previously stood. It was designed by the acclaimed architect Erno Goldfinger. The LINLEY shop covers two floors, ground and basement, linked by a signature Goldfinger spiral staircase and sells a significant collection of LINLEY products.

2007

LINLEY Interior Design launches, a natural extension of the company and after repeated requests from clients.
“We apply exactly the same principles of tailoring and engineering in interior design as we do to creating individual items of furniture.”

David Linley

2012

At Masterpiece London, LINLEY launched the marquetry London Skyline screen, paying homage to the iconic skyline and in celebration of the London Olympics and Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the screen incorporates 20,000 individual pieces of veneer. Within a day the screen was sold and 5 more variations were commissioned, each one personal to the client.

2015

LINLEY celebrates its 30th Anniversary milestone with a collection of accessories that take you on a visual journey through its creative history. Inspired by past LINLEY designs
that have been reinterpreted for this collection, each of the accessories reference a year in the company’s history, together telling LINLEY’s unique story.

2016

LINLEY relaunches its flagship Belgravia showroom at 60 Pimlico Road. The new LINLEY store was inspired by David’s childhood experience of spending time with this father, Lord Snowdon, the architect and photographer, in his workshops and photographic studios.

In his book, Design & Detail in the Home, David explains that ‘My father’s appetite for wooden floors, stark white walls, metal shelving and streamlined designs’ and this is reflected in what promises to be a venue and creative hub as much as a store and showroom.